Prostatitis is a painful condition that causes the prostate, and sometimes the area around the prostate to become inflamed. There are several types of prostatitis, but the chronic form is one of the worst because its cause is unknown, though researchers have theories. Therefore, there is no real cure; however, symptoms may be mitigated by using strategies to decrease pain and discomfort. While it has not been definitively proven, there is some evidence to suggest that a change in diet may help quell the effects of chronic prostatitis.

Foods to avoid

A small survey of men suffering from chronic prostatitis showed that around half of them saw their symptoms worsen after eating certain foods. For this reason, it may be helpful to be mindful of what you eat and take special notice of any worsening of symptoms that occurs after consuming food or beverages. Some of the common culprits pointed to in the survey were:

  • Coffee
  • Chili
  • Alcoholic beverages
  • Tea
  • Spicy foods
  • Hot peppers
  • Wheat
  • Caffeine
  • Acidic foods

Foods to eat

A healthy diet can do much to improve your overall health. Doctors recommend that your diet include plenty of foods that are high in fiber and drinking lots of water, in order to prevent constipation, as straining can increase prostate pain. Foods high in fiber include:

  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower
  • Cabbage
  • Berries, such as raspberries, strawberries, blackberries, elderberries, cranberries, and gooseberries.
  • Leafy greens like romaine lettuce, turnip greens, and spinach.
  • Celery
  • Beans, specifically kidney, navy, French, black, and pinto beans, as well as chickpeas.
  • White, Portobello, and shiitake mushrooms

Prostate health in general is benefitted by a diet that is low in dairy, meat, and saturated fat and full of antioxidants, zinc, and omega-3 fatty acids. This means lots of plant products, coldwater fish (like sardines, trout, and salmon), and oysters, crab, pumpkin seeds, and other foods that are rich in zinc.

Other strategies

Other methods that have been suggested to help those with chronic prostatitis lower their pain and discomfort include:

  • Avoid sitting for long periods of time and perform aerobic exercises routinely.
  • Take a sitz bath or sit in a tub of warm water that just covers your buttocks.
  • Stress management techniques, like deep breathing, may help.

Sources

Espinosa, Geo N.D. L.AC, CNS, RH (2014) Foods to Avoid for Prostatitis. Available from: http://www.prostate.net/2014/nutrition/foods-avoid-prostatitis/.

HealthAliciousNess.com. Top 10 Foods Highest in Fiber. Available from: http://www.healthaliciousness.com/articles/foods-high-in-dietary-fiber.php.

Niddk.nih.gov (2014) Prostatitis: Inflammation of the Prostate. Available from: http://kidney.niddk.nih.gov/KUDiseases/pubs/prostatitis/index.aspx.

Stengler, Mark A. (2011) Foods and Supplements That Relieve Prostate Pain. Available from: http://bottomlinehealth.com/foods-and-supplements-that-relieve-prostate-pain/.

Stracker, Denine MD (2013) 4 Foods Your Prostate Does NOT Want You To Eat. Available from: http://www.healthline.com/health-slideshow/4-foods-your-prostate-does-not-want-you-eat.

Webmd.com (2014) Prostatitis – Home Treatment. Available from: http://www.webmd.com/men/tc/prostatitis-home-treatment.

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I am interested in all aspects related to mens's health, in particular sexual health as we age. In my spare time I like to train with weights since that's a great way to boost your testosterone levels and feel overall happy. It is never too late to change your lifestyle into something better. Small positive changes will accumulate over time and bring you happiness in life. You can find my opinions on supplements and devices for men on this website, and also from users such as yourself. Remember to do your research before buying anything.